disability news, opinion, reviews, and a passion for accessibility » News

By: Walking Is Overrated  05-Apr-2012
Keywords: Disability News

disability news, opinion, reviews, and a passion for accessibility » News

A blind Christchurch schoolboy is frustrated he has to miss out on NCEA credits because exam organisers say they cannot accommodate his disability.

Hagley Community College year 13 pupil Dylan Neale cannot sit Tuesday’s level-three National Certificate in Educational Achievement (NCEA) drama exam because it requires watching and analysing a DVD.

The New Zealand Qualifications Authority has said it does not know how to enable that to happen for Dylan, 18. The authority has ruled out providing a reader/writer or speaker.

“If I could just do the exam like everyone else, it’d be good, as I’d get more credits and it sounds like an interesting exam.”

With dreams of being a comedian, Dylan said he enjoyed the freedom drama provided. Being unable to sit the drama exam “loaded a lot of extra pressure on the major production we had to do, which was worth five credits, as it meant I really had to get it right and it was stressful”.

The exam is worth four credits and Dylan needs 42 to reach his University Entrance (UE) goal. He still expects to gain UE, but does not want other sight-impaired pupils disadvantaged in a similar way.

Keywords: Disability News

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