on production

By: Say Books Online  05-Apr-2012
Keywords: Publishing

I was musing again about Content Strategy and it occurred to me that there are two ways of looking at it.

There is what I would call the ‘Master’ view: the all-seeing eye that knows everything, plans everything and creates clear structures to realise a certain vision. This is most appropriate to the ‘Enterprise’ model, particularly for industries where compliance is incredibly important or for highly structured modular content.

The other is the ‘Darwinian’ view: life develops largely through chance, circumstance, and constraints, making use of minute building blocks (DNA) to combine and create new life forms in endless and unforeseeable combinations. And, likewise, the binary nature of digital (so simple that it’s either on or it’s off) makes content uncontainable, unconstrainable and endlessly combinable. This paradox is both a threat and an opportunity.

Earlier this year, I was searching for a web-based tool that could be used to create both EPUBS and print books. Given the rise and rise of EPUB, Print on Demand, and the increasing sophistication of HTML5 and CSS3 for print as well as onscreen, this seemed like the future of publishing.

Given that the present/future of publishing is digital (I include POD in this), it would seem a good idea to focus on and develop the potential of (X)HTML5 (strict) and CSS3 for all publishing (print products, EPUB, mobile, etc) rather than going down the DTP and ‘traditional’ XML route.

Keywords: Publishing

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05-Apr-2012

on publishing

I tweet about Castle under a ‘Castley’ pseudonym, and fangirl with the best of them (many of them teenagers, but also a fair smattering of English majors, doctors, teachers, film/media types, and of course, Firefly fans). One of the reasons may be that much of the current language of content management uses the language of logic, with little attention to the lyrical or personal.


05-Apr-2012

on writers

I tweet about Castle under a ‘Castley’ pseudonym, and fangirl with the best of them (many of them teenagers, but also a fair smattering of English majors, doctors, teachers, film/media types, and of course, Firefly fans). What became increasingly interesting to me as I watched the show and followed fans on Twitter was the way the show crossed the usual boundaries of fandoms.