Banana lovers « All Good Bananas

By: All Good Bananas  06-Dec-2011
Keywords: Health Benefits, Fresh Produce

Banana lovers « All Good Bananas

All Good kicked-off summer banana-styles last weekend.

Once the race got underway, the Tryathletes first ran, then burnt round the track on bikes, and finally slid their way to glory across the finish line. Some epic slip’n’slide action from all, rewarded with an All Good banana from Gorilla.

When you buy All Good Bananas, you are not only ensuring that a fair price is paid to the grower, but you are also contributing to the Fairtrade Premium.

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This Premium goes back to the growing co-operative (in the case of All Good Bananas, El Guabo), but who decides how this money is spent? And where?

Photo: Duncan Innes, Words: Catherine McGregor

(Don’t worry though, no bananas were injured during the taking of this photo… and their growers are doing alright too).

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Alright yes, gold-star to you, they are in fact just dried bananas, but there is a lot more to these juicy little fellas than meets the eye.

To get them here to New Zealand, we started working with and Samoa’s (a not-for-profit organisation working with over 250 small-scale farmers). Organically certified by WIBDI has been working with Samoan farmers to export organically certified Misiluki bananas to NZ since 2008. By partnering closely with Oxfam and WIBDI, we’ve been able to provide these Samoan farmers with a market for a product that currently has almost no economic value locally.

As well as being good for the growers, and in turn Samoa, there are plenty of documented health benefits for eating All Good’s organic dried banana chunks too.

Unlike banana chips, which are commonly deep fried, All Good’s banana chunks are naturally dried. Being made from the more sweeter-tasting Misiluki banana means that nothing else needs to be added; we’re talking no sugar, no sweetener, no preservative and no oil. The bananas are first peeled, then sliced and dried ripe.

All in all making our organic dried banana chunks good for the growers’ futures, as well as a tasty healthy sweet treat for you too.

Conscious Consumers month is all about knowing where your food is from, and the big, big difference you can make with small buying decisions (like buying Fairtrade for instance).

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And marvel at the goodie pack one lucky listener got to win… <gasps-in-awe>

Aww next time eh? It’ll be you, promise…

…and for the environment category too, no less.

Bringing fresh produce from across the other side of the world doesn’t instantly seem to be the most sustainable option, but for a country that is literally bananas for the yellow fruit, importing is currently the only viable commercial option. So we say, why not do it in a way that limits the impact on the environment as much as possible?

We’re super-proud of the work our growers do to ensure the environment (and their health) is looked after now and for future generations. As Angel says (pictured above with his daughter Daniella) “The important thing is to keep helping us by buying our Fairtrade bananas… If you don’t buy our fruit, we can’t look forward to better times and keep taking care of the environment”.

Oh and keep your fingers crossed for us on the 30th Nov too eh, eh.

from Fairtrade UK visited our shores in June. A gifted and passionate speaker, she spoke about the rigour and standards behind the Fairtrade mark and just exactly why it guarantees a better deal for Third World Producers. Click or on the image above to see what she has to say.

So you’re thinking of trying out the Organic Dried Banana Chunks eh? But not sure where to find ‘em?

Use our handy little compendium of stockists below to make seeking out the ‘Healthy & Sweet As’ displays, easy as:

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Christchurch

Hamilton

Wellington

Auckland


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You can buy these beauties in Auckland from:

And we’re currently working on stores in Wellington too.

Hang tight Wellingtonians. Soon, soon.

And they taste YUM.

Launching at the next week, you can already buy these little beauties from , , , (Grey Lynn), (Glen Innes) and from Sat 10th Sept at the Kokako pop-up cafe at . All for the lovely little price of around $3 per pack.

Try ‘em, do.

The information in this article was current at 02 Dec 2011

Keywords: Fresh Produce, Health Benefits

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06-Dec-2011

Growers « All Good Bananas

Dad, Abel Ugarte, Mom, Elizabeth Urdiales sons Abel Alberto and Axel Andres and baby Eimy Elizabeth all live on the family farm in El Guabo where Abel and Elizabeth grow the bananas you can buy from Commonsense Organics in Wellington. As well as being good for the growers, and in turn Samoa, there are plenty of documented health benefits for eating All Good’s organic dried banana chunks too.


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Samoa « All Good Bananas

By partnering closely with Oxfam and WIBDI, we’ve been able to provide these Samoan farmers with a market for a product that currently has almost no economic value locally. Being made from the more sweeter-tasting Misiluki banana means that nothing else needs to be added; we’re talking no sugar, no sweetener, no preservative and no oil.


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General « All Good Bananas

At one school he got to visit again a boy told the story of how he stood next to the banana’s in a shop and told people how the Fairtrade bananas helped people to get medical care, while another student gave up some pocket money so there parents would buy Fairtrade coffee.


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Recipes « All Good Bananas

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Uncategorized « All Good Bananas

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